sempiternus

¡Bienvenidos a mi espacio particular para desatar a la fangirl que llevo dentro!
Solo se libra lo que el tiempo perdone.

The way Thornton looks at Margaret  (◡‿◡✿) 

(via lyannastarkling)

stagecoachjessi:

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(via dear-mr-darcy)

”It took me 10 years to be ready for this. I’ve got a pretty good foundation of friends and family that will always keep me grounded no matter what. But I don’t think I would have been ready for it 10 years ago. So I’m really happy with the way it worked out. You need to learn how to do this. You need to learn how to keep your cool, learn how to be a leader on set, learn how to act. F—-, I still know I’ve got a ton to learn. It’s all a learning experience. I’m going to school every day.” [x]

(via turncloak)

behind the scenes of campari 2015

Sherlock episodes summary

(via whiddlesmort)

Janning, to be sure, is a tragic figure. We believe he loathed the evil he did. But compassion for the present torture of his soul must not beget forgetfulness of the torture and death of millions by the government of which he was a part. Janning’s record and his fate illuminate the most shattering truth that has emerged from this trial. If he and the other defendants were all depraved perverts - if the leaders of the Third Reich were sadistic monsters and maniacs - these events would have no more moral significance than an earthquake or other natural catastrophes. But this trial has shown that under the stress of a national crisis, men - even able and extraordinary men - can delude themselves into the commission of crimes and atrocities so vast and heinous as to stagger the imagination. No one who has sat through this trial can ever forget. The sterilization of men because of their political beliefs… The murder of children… How easily that can happen! There are those in our country today, too, who speak of the “protection” of the country. Of “survival”. The answer to that is: survival as what? A country isn’t a rock. And it isn’t an extension of one’s self. It’s what it stands for, when standing for something is the most difficult! Before the people of the world - let it now be noted in our decision here that this is what we stand for: justice, truth… and the value of a single human being!
Judge Dan Haywood (Spencer Tracy) ~ Judgement at Nuremberg (via now-watching)
fuckyeahspencertracy:

Montgomery Clift was at a very, very low point in his life at this time. He was drinking a lot. I think he was on dope. And after twelve o’clock you couldn’t use Monty… he’d have to go home, he was out of it. But I remember, especially one morning, I was the lawyer interviewing Monty and he couldn’t make it, he couldn’t remember, he couldn’t put two and two together, and he was just a total mess. And Tracy just said, “Talk to me. Play it to me, Monty. Just look at me and play it to me.” You know, he was like a pop, you know, real sweet, nice pop. And Monty kind of… okay. And he played it to Spence and it came out great.”— Richard Widmark [on filming Judgement at Nuremberg]

fuckyeahspencertracy:

Montgomery Clift was at a very, very low point in his life at this time. He was drinking a lot. I think he was on dope. And after twelve o’clock you couldn’t use Monty… he’d have to go home, he was out of it. But I remember, especially one morning, I was the lawyer interviewing Monty and he couldn’t make it, he couldn’t remember, he couldn’t put two and two together, and he was just a total mess. And Tracy just said, “Talk to me. Play it to me, Monty. Just look at me and play it to me.” You know, he was like a pop, you know, real sweet, nice pop. And Monty kind of… okay. And he played it to Spence and it came out great.”

Richard Widmark [on filming Judgement at Nuremberg]

Happy Birthday Eva Green! (July 6, 1980)

"Hello, my child. I’ve been waiting. What games we will have now."